Shapes

There are a number of references to shapes in Joe and the Camera.  Here are some basic ideas to adapt according to the age of your class.

Ideas for a shape party

Design a party invitation for your ‘shape’ party and create a shape menu. Design and make a shape hat with circles and lots of different polygons. Design a meal on a paper plate. Model the food from clay, plasticine etc. All the food must be square, circular or triangular … or if you are very clever, hexagonal or pentagonal. Remember we are talking about 2-D shapes so we are just thinking about the face of the food.

Look for Joel Penkman on the internet. He is a UK based artist who paints sweets, biscuits and cakes that are so realistic it is hard to believe that they are not the real thing.

www.joelpenkman.com

Arrange some sweets or biscuits and replicate the design by painting. A photograph of the study alongside the resulting art is rewarding.

More shapes and maths.  

Have a shape hunt around school looking for both 3D and 2D shapes.  Burglar alarms are a good source of pentagons and hexagons.

Seek out 3-D boxes; triangular prism Toblerone, polygonal Smarties tubes and cheese triangle boxes, square pyramid fererro rocher and cuboid chocolate boxes. Cubes are hard to find.

These boxes can be deconstructed and taken apart to find their faces (the sides). For example a toblerone box has 2 triangles and 3 rectangles.

Build a large triangle with four small Toblerones.

Triangular numbers

This is the Triangular Number Sequence: 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36 …

This sequence is made from a pattern of dots which form a triangle.

By adding another row of dots and counting all the dots  the sequence is developed.

 

 

                                     triangular numbers

 

 

Find out about Pascal’s triangle

 

 Sierpinski’s triangle                                                                                                                                                        
This can be built up with coloured paper cut into identical equilateral triangles.  It makes an impressive wall display using plain and patterned paper.  With Christmas paper this could take the form of a large Christmas tree.